Nazima Parveen New Book, "Contested Homelands: Politics of Space and Identity

Updated: May 25




About Contested Homelands


This book argues that the changing character of Muslim community and their living space in Delhi is a product of historical processes. The discourse of homeland and the realities of Partition established the notion of 'Muslim-dominated areas' as 'exclusionary' and 'contested' zones. These localities turned out to be those pockets where the dominant ideas of nation had to be engineered, materialized and practiced. The book makes an attempt to revisit these complexities by investigating community-space relationship in colonial and postcolonial Delhi. It raises two fundamental questions: How did community and space relation come to be defined on religious lines? In what ways were 'Muslim-dominated' areas perceived as contested zones? Invoking the ideas of homeland as a useful vantage point to enter into the wider discourse around the conceptualization of space, the book suggests that the relation between Muslim communities and their living spaces has evolved out of a long process of politicization and communalization of space in Delhi.


Table of contentsIntroduction

1: Colonial Encounters, Identities, Conflicts and Space: A Background, 1809-1939 2: Contested Homelands: Territorial Nations and the Idea of Pakistan, 1940-1947 3: Demarcated Space: 'Muslim Refugee Camps' and 'Muslim Zones' in Delhi, 1947-1954 4: Caste, Class and Religion of Meat: Contest and Conflicts in Muslim Localities, 1955-1970 5: Reorganization of Muslim Space: Clearance, Resettlement and Redevelopment, 1970-1977 Conclusion

You can access these details from https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/contested-homelands-9789389000900/.

You can buy the book at Amazon: https://www.amazon.in/Contested-Homelands-Politics-Space-Identity/dp/9389000904


and https://www.porchlightbooks.com/product/contested-homelands-politics-of-space-and-identity--nazima-parveen


Google has also listed the book, please see. https://books.google.co.in/books/about/Contested_Homelands.html?id=KflTzAEACAAJ&redir_esc=y


This book argues that the changing character of Muslim community and their living space in Delhi is a product of historical processes. The discourse of homeland and the realities of Partition established the notion of 'Muslim-dominated areas' as 'exclusionary' and 'contested' zones. These localities turned out to be those pockets where the dominant ideas of nation had to be engineered, materialized and practiced. The book makes an attempt to revisit these complexities by investigating community-space relationship in colonial and postcolonial Delhi. It raises two fundamental questions:

How did community and space relation come to be defined on religious lines?

In what ways were 'Muslim-dominated' areas perceived as contested zones?

Invoking the ideas of homeland as a useful vantage point to enter into the wider discourse around the conceptualization of space, the book suggests that the relation between Muslim communities and their living spaces has evolved out of a long process of politicization and communalization of space in Delhi.




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